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Description

The Alida Perreault Papers consist largely of correspondence sent to Alida throughout her life from family, friends, and romantic interests. The correspondence is entirely personal, save for the letters concerning the South Hadley Women's Club. As Alida was president of the club, those letters are largely formal invitations and responses to other women's clubs in neighboring towns. There is also an extensive selection of greeting cards, sent for Christmas, birthdays, and other holidays over the years. There is a small assortment of newspaper clippings about Alida, as well as other ephemera. One interesting set of correspondence is a selection of literature from prospective universities and colleges, sent in 1932 to Alida as a graduating high school senior. The documents provide insight into the typical opportunities offered to young women at the time. The collection documents an extended French-Canadian family network that traversed the U.S. and Canada border. Discussions of visits between family and friends reveal information about travel, social visiting patterns, and the role of correspondence in maintaining family ties over long distances. As the collection consists largely of letters from a young woman's adolescence, the content shows language, topics of conversation, and interests of a teenager in the early 1930s. The cards and letters from friends and suitors offer a picture of social norms for young adults. Letters, notes, and postcards to Alida Capistrant are from friends and family, ranging in date from 1924 to 1941, and contain small, daily moments and conversations that reflect growing up, childhood friendship, and the strength of familial ties. Letters detail the death of Alida's grandmother and her sister Emma, summer boyfriends (i.e. Billy, Everett), Alida's homesickness during an extended vacation, and favorite pastimes.

Date(s)
1906 to 1957
Contributing Institution
Description

3/4 in. archival original is transfer from original 2 in. tape. // Dropout throughout. // Episode produced in 1981 by Maine Public Broadcasting for a series entitled Reflets et Lumiere II, which explores the evolution of French Americans in Maine. Introduced by two men, the episode features a short comedy play in French and English written by Gregoire Chabot that examines culture shock, breakdown, and conflicting customs for the French Americans. Two couples play immigrants stranded in an automobile that they can not operate, and can not understand the instructions they are given by passers-by in English. Later, their descendants are stuck with a horse-drawn wagon that can not move. In the back they discover boxes containing 'Notre Heritage,' and must decide which items can be discarded so that the wagon will be light enough to move. Shot on location, has no subtitles. Episode concludes with a short dialogue between two French-speaking puppets: one is a log, the other is a potato.

Date(s)
1981-09-28
Contributing Institution
Description

The Jobin Family Archives contain materials collected by family members and compiled by Rev. Philippe Thibodeau. The bulk of the collection includes correspondence between family members in New England and Québec from 1890 to the present day. Of particular note are two extant letters by Joseph-Jobin to his family in Québec from Boston that pertain to his immigration in 1890. Also of note, is an extensive collection of artwork by Théodore and Marie-Eugénie Jobin, two copies of an unpublished manuscript, The History of Fashion, by Marie- Eugénie Jobin, a collection of rare books acquired by Louis Jobin, proprietor of Schoenhof’s Foreign Books in Cambridge, MA., and letters from youngest son, Gustave Antoine Jobin, to his mother and other relatives from the Western Front during World War I.

Date(s)
1843 to 2000
Contributing Institution
Description

Lucille West, 80, talks with Kim Chase in French and English about growing up on farms in Canada and in North Troy, Vermont. In French she talks with Kim about various French songs. In English Lucille relates how her family came to move to Vermont when she was 10, and the adjustments she had to make in learning new ways and a new language, English. She also talks about celebrating Christmas in Vermont, which her family had never done before in Canada, home health remedies, foods eaten, how her mother became blind when Lucille was only 4, and other family stories. Lucille and Kim switch between French and English but there is enough in English for the non-French speaker to understand.

Date(s)
1996
Contributing Institution
Description

Studio Photograph of (from left to right) Maria Perras, Louise Perras, Alphonse Perras, and baby Rose Perras taken during a visit to Adams, MA before emigrating permanently from Canada.

Date(s)
1908
Contributing Institution